I had this awesome idea (I started musing on it after my ABI tune-up in August, but haven’t gotten around to flushing it out; lack of follow-through again.  Balance. Eye. Elbow. Follow-through.  Alas, I’m only a BEE.  And the follow-through is what adds the most style to any shot.)

The idea was about riding coasters and marching with a thirty pound baritone saxophone strapped to my neck . . . strengthening brain stem? The makings of a bionic woman? (Is anyone interested in that being filled out?)  Where’s the boundary between strengthening something (building stamina, making longer term outcomes more likely) and weakening it (making longer term outcomes less likely)?  Time scales and success, how they influence causal outcomes.  Then there are those pesky intervening variables.  But I’m only going to write more about general and specific stuff if anyone’s interested (now or in the future . . . anyone reading this at some time, feel free to drop a comment).

Otherwise I’m just going with the links I already had, and going with auto pilot:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shockwave_%28Six_Flags_Great_America%29

(so that’s the story behind the delays…)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whizzer_%28roller_coaster%29
(one to be loved more with age, apparently)

Shockwave was very young when we went on it. I remember we ended up hitting it repeatedly because the park was closing and the line was finally short (apparently most people had given up on it because it was broken-down, with a long line, most of the day). By the end, my ears were ringing, I had a slight headache, and I wasn’t so sure I should’ve gone on it so many times in a row. I HAVE TO believe, now, that it all happened before I knew of any of my tumors. It may have been after I knew of my bilateral vestibular schwannomas, and being diagnosed with NF2. I know I was defiantly stubborn at first that anything in my life would change as a result of NF2, pretty much thinking it would not take me down without a fight. Anyhow, if you are genetically predisposed to developing intracranial tumors, then I do not recommend riding violent roller coasters.

I am also surprised how many spontaneous mutants have been coming to my attention, in circles that aren’t directly related to NF2.

But I’m thinking about other things. It’s easiest to write mindlessly about experiences, while my mind’s actually working on other puzzles.

(And to you, my Whizzer co-rider: I thought I saw you this weekend, and I did see paisley and side-burns that made me think of you. It is you who introduced me to the word, “anomalous,” and I hope you’re doing well, should you ever find my blog.  Locos only.)

Btw, I thought the Whizzer was, “The Wizard,” for I-don’t-know-how-long!

“Yeah, okay, let’s ride the wizard!”

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